Keeping Hostede’s Cultural Dimensions in mind, there are definitely implications for those working with TCKS, especially in the classroom.

POWER DISTANCE

A. Large Power Distance

If there are students in your classroom that come from a culture that has a large power distance, then the culture will put stress on the personal “wisdom” a teacher has, which is transferred to the student in their relationship with a particular teacher. A teacher merits the respect of his/her students. This results in a teacher-centered education (there is an emphasis on order).

B. Small Power Distance

If there are students in your classroom that come from a culture that has small power distance, then the culture will put stress on impersonal “truth” which in principle can be obtained from any competent person – this person does not have to be a “Teacher.” A teacher will respect the independence of his/her students. This results in a student-centered education (there is an emphasis on initiative).

INDIVIDUALISM VS COLLECTIVISM

A. Individualism

In a situation with students from a culture that stresses individualism, the individual students will speak up in class in response to a general invitation by the teacher. The fear of “losing face” is very weak. Education is a way of improving one’s economic worth and self-respect based on ability and competence. Diploma certificates have little symbolic value. Teachers are expected to be strictly impartial.

B. Collectivism

In a situation with students from a culture that stresses collectivism, there will be a positive association in society with whatever is rooted in tradition. Individual students will only speak up in class when called on personally by the teacher. Neither the teacher nor any student should ever be made to lose face. Education is a way of gaining prestige in one’s social environment and of joining a higher status group. Diploma certificates are important and displayed on walls. Teachers are expected to give preferential treatment to some students.

UNCERTAINTY AVOIDANCE

A. Low Uncertainty Avoidance

If you have students with low uncertainty avoidance, then the students will feel comfortable in unstructured situations. They can handle vague objectives, broad assignments and no timetables. Teachers are allowed to say, “I don’t know”. A good teacher uses plain language. Students are rewarded for innovative approaches to problem solving. Teachers are expected to suppress emotions (and so are students). Teachers interpret intellectual disagreements as stimulating experience. Teachers seek parents’ ideas.

B. High Uncertainty Avoidance

If you have students with high uncertainty avoidance, then the students will feel more comfortable in structured situations and will need precise objectives, detailed assignments, and strict timetables. Teachers are expected to have all the answers. A good teacher uses academic language. Students are rewarded for accuracy in problem solving. Teachers are allowed to behave emotionally (and so are students). Teachers will interpret intellectual disagreements as personal disloyalty. Teachers consider themselves experts who cannot learn anything from lay parents and parents agree.

MASCULINITY VS FEMININITY

A. Masculinity

When you have students in your classroom from a culture that is masculine in nature, then you will find that teachers openly praise good students. Teachers will use the best students as the norm and the system will reward a student’s academic performance. A student’s failure in school is a severe blow to his/her self-image and may in extreme cases lead to suicide. Students admire brilliance in teachers. Students compete with each other in class. Students try to make themselves visible.

B. Femininity

When you have students in your classroom from a culture that is feminine in nature, then you will find that teachers avoid openly praising students and use average students as the norm. The system will reward students with social adaptation. A student’s failure in school is a relatively minor incident. Students admire friendliness in teachers, practice mutual solidarity, and try to behave modestly.

Other links for Culturally Responsive Teaching