Resources for Parents

All these topics speak to various subjects for those going or living overseas where the “normal” structures are not available. They are also of value for staff living in their home culture.

The websites or articles listed are some valuable resources for parents and young adults.

Talking to children and teens about abuse

Talking about disclosure:

Advising teens about sexual health – these sites as secular but have many good ideas for parents:

Family relationships

Developing sexuality

Abstinence

How to talk to young people about technology: 

Living Wisely in the Digital Age Course Connections

Talking to teens about technology

Wellbeing and Technology

How to talk to young people about risky behavior

How to stay safe at University or college

The Church of England Procedures and Policy

Online Protection for Multiple Ages

Parental Controls

BBC Own It is a British app and website (own It) to support young people in the digital world. It provides help in handling a smart phone and how to make informed choices, The app can be installed on their phone and parents should look at the website to see if this can be of help to them. this website can only be used in the UK.

How to deep your relationship with your child through parental guides that help navigate teen culture, conversation kits, free weekly Cultural Translator, Christian Parenting blog and additional resources.

A parental resource to help you and loved ones live a life free from porn using accountability software.

Is Tik Tok Safe for Kids. This guide for parents helps them assess if they want to use the app and what setting are wise to put in place.

Decision Data is a U. S. secular website that provides useful information on parental controls for U.S.TV providers, Netflix, Google, Apple and how to block various websites. It also addresses the issues of possible scams for children and teens. In addition, it provides guidelines for screen times based upon age.

It’s easy to convey the message to children that their bodies – or particular parts of their bodies – are shameful. This misconception fuels confusion, embarrassment, and secrecy, and often prevents children from recognizing or reporting sexual abuse. God Made All of Me (Justin Holcomb and Lindsey Holcomb) is a simply-told, beautifully-illustrated story to help families talk about these sensitive issues with two- to eight-year-old children.